Posted by: Upāsaka | 04/17/2015

Inescapable

My thoughts have turned quite suddenly to the precarious nature of our existence not just individually but as a global civilization. I won’t get into the details or delve into the reasons for my rekindled fears but suffice it to say that fear of death and o impermanence have proven to be the greatest spiritual catalysts in this lifetime.

As my mind meandered down these paths it stopped and pondered the possibility of the death of my children. As repulsive and heart wrenching as such a thought is it is a reality that countless mothers and fathers have experienced. I often think of some of the horror stories that came out of Cambodia at the time of the Khmer Rouge and realize there is nothing that truly separates me from those families except an accident of space and time. When we accept the Lord Buddha’s teaching and realize that we have been brother, sister, father, mother, soon and daughter to everyone else it becomes truly hard to understand why it is su hard to feel the same concern for all beings.

May we look upon all beings with the tenderness of a mother and seek to deepen our love and understanding while there is yet time left.

Posted by: Upāsaka | 04/17/2015

Inescapable

My thoughts have turned quite suddenly to the precarious nature of our existence not just individually but as a global civilization. I won’t get into the details or delve into the reasons for my rekindled fears but suffice it to say that fear of death and o impermanence have proven to be the greatest spiritual catalysts in this lifetime.

As my mind meandered down these paths it stopped and pondered the possibility of the death of my children. As repulsive and heart wrenching as such a thought is it is a reality that countless mothers and fathers have experienced. I often think of some of the horror stories that came out of Cambodia at the time of the Khmer Rouge and realize there is nothing that truly separates me from those families except an accident of space and time. When we accept the Lord Buddha’s teaching and realize that we have been brother, sister, father, mother, soon and daughter to everyone else it becomes truly hard to understand why it is su hard to feel the same concern for all beings.

May we look upon all beings with the tenderness of a mother and seek to deepen our love and understanding while there is yet time left.

Posted by: Upāsaka | 04/16/2015

Fatigue

Since we returned from Jamaica I have had little to no time for anything other than work and no energy at all. The thing I find most difficult at times like this is my tendency to ride myself do hard and to criticize myself for not bucking down and doing better. May I see the judgement for what it is and with in whatever small ways I can to reestablish my practice.

Posted by: Upāsaka | 04/15/2015

Humility

300. Humility means humbleness of mind and being unassuming in manner. A person possessing it has put away pride and arrogance, he resembles a foot-wiping cloth, a bull with its horns cut off, a snake with its fangs removed. He is gentle, cheerful and easy to speak to.

Paramatthajotika 144

Shared via Buddha Vacana for Android
http://www.buddhavacana.net

Posted by: Upāsaka | 04/13/2015

Taking Joy in the Good Fortune of Others

This blog is, if only in name, supposed to have something to do with the sublime abidings and yet mudita send to get short shrift time and again. Walking through the row houses and brownstones of Park Slope I have caught myself one more in envious reverie of all of the people with the nice houses, Nov cars and children week go to private school. I say familiar because it is so often unexamined and is something I feel on an almost daily basis. And, yet, it is as simple as changing the emphasis to one of loving-kindness and the entire scene shifts. What would I want any less than good fortune, opportunity and happiness to prevail for others?

May we heard ourselves against our own folly and take heed in all we do.

Posted by: Upāsaka | 04/11/2015

Strengthening Patience

101. One’s patience should be strengthened by thinking: “Those who have no patience are afflicted in this world and do actions that lead to affliction in the next life.”
One should think: “Although this suffering arises because of the wrong deeds of others, my body is the field for that suffering, and the actions which brought it into being are mine.”
One should think: “If there were no wrongdoers, how could I bring patience to perfection?”
One should think: “Although he is a wrongdoer now, in the past he may have been my benefactor.”
One should think: “A wrongdoer is at the same time a benefactor because through him patience can be practised.”
One should think: “All beings are like my own children and who would get angry over the misdeeds of one’s own children?”
One should think: “He does me wrong because of some fault in myself; I should strive to remove this.”

Cariyapitaka Atthakata 290

Shared via Buddha Vacana for Android
http://www.buddhavacana.net

May we all perfect the skill of patience.

Posted by: Upāsaka | 04/10/2015

Creature of Habit

Like it or not it seems that I am truly a creature of habit. The last week or so my routine was completely thrown off by the change in location and the perceived exigencies of my situation. As a result my practice suffered and my posts here were sporadic. Having gotten in last night around 9:30 and spent the night at my in-laws in Long Island things are still not quite “right” but I can feel a real, of inexplicable, change.
Having noticed just how off things were the last ten days and being aware of the sudden shift upon my return to NY has given me lots to consider. What is habit and what is routine? Ot, better yet, is it useful? Send to me that at this point in my life it is and I am grateful to have a place called home. 

Posted by: Upāsaka | 04/07/2015

Work-cation

For the last will we have been in Jamaica visiting my stepmother and, ask the while. I have been working 8 to 10 hours a day to prove to myself and my partner that I really did intend to work remotely and that this entire endeavor was not a cover for an extra vacation. My level of guilt and anxiety over this has lead me to believe that this kind of remote work set up just isn’t worth it.

So what can I take from this? Well, if anything it is that I really am concerned about my partner’s well-being and the fairness of our agreement. Sure it is imperfect and I “should” be able to pull this off but, where we’re at Notre, that’s just not  a possibility.

Posted by: Upāsaka | 04/05/2015

Unskillful Thought

95. There are these three unskillful types of thought. What three? Thoughts of self-esteem, thoughts of gains, honours and fame and thoughts of worrying about others.

Itivuttaka 72

Shared via Buddha Vacana for Android
http://www.buddhavacana.net

Posted by: Upāsaka | 04/04/2015

Worldly Progress

94. Four things lead to worldly progress: achievement in alertness, in caution, in good friendship and achievement in balanced livelihood. And what is achievement in alertness? Concerning this, in whatever way one earns a living, whether by farming, trading, cattle rearing, archery, service to the king or by some craft, in that one becomes deft and tireless, gifted with an inquiring turn of mind into ways and means, and able to arrange and carry out the job.
And what is achievement in caution? Concerning this, whatever one earns by work and effort, collected by strength of arm and sweat of brow in a just and lawful manner, one husbands, watches and guards so that kings do not seize it, thieves do not steal it, fire or water do not destroy it, and unwanted heirs do not remove it.
And what is good friendship? Concerning this, in whatever village or town one lives, one associates with, converses with, discusses things with people either young or old, who are cultured, full of faith, full of virtue, full of charity and full of wisdom. One acts in accordance with the faith of the faithful, the virtue of the virtuous, the charity of the charitable and the wisdom of the wise.
And what is balanced livelihood? Concerning this, one knows both his income and expenditure and lives neither extravagantly nor miserly, knowing that income after expenditure will stand at so much and that expenses will not exceed income. Just as a goldsmith or his apprentice knows, on holding the scales, that so much has dipped down and so much has tilted up, one knows income and expenditure.
If one with small income were to lead an extravagant life there would be those who would say: “He enjoys his wealth like a wood-apple eater.” Likewise, if one with a good income were to be miserly, there would be those who would say: “He will die like a beggar.”
There are four channels through which the wealth one has collected is lost: debauchery, drunkenness, gambling and friendship with evildoers.
Imagine there were a great tank of water with four inlets and outlets, and a man was to close the inlets but keep the outlets open. If there were no rain we could expect the water to decrease. In the same way, there are the four channels through which wealth is lost. There are these four channels through which the wealth one has collected is preserved: avoidance of debauchery, drunkenness, gambling and friendship with evildoers.
Imagine there were a great tank of water with four inlets and outlets, and a man was to keep the inlets open and close the outlets. If he did this and there were good rainfall, we could expect the water to increase. In the same way, there are these four channels through which wealth is preserved.

Anguttara Nikaya IV.281

Shared via Buddha Vacana for Android
http://www.buddhavacana.net

Older Posts »

Categories

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 386 other followers